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126 High Court Collegium Recommendations Remain Pending With the Central Government: Union Law Minister's Response on Judicial Vacancies

Shrutika Pandey
3 Dec 2021 4:25 AM GMT
126 High Court Collegium Recommendations Remain Pending With the Central Government: Union Law Ministers Response on Judicial Vacancies
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The Union Law Minister Kiren Rijiju told in the Rajya Sabha that out of 164 recommendations received from the High Court Collegium, 31 are pending with the Supreme Court collegium while seven were remitted to the High Courts. The answer came in response to a question posed by an MP from CPI (M) John Brittas. The submitted data reveals that a total of 126 of 164 recommendations are pending...

The Union Law Minister Kiren Rijiju told in the Rajya Sabha that out of 164 recommendations received from the High Court Collegium, 31 are pending with the Supreme Court collegium while seven were remitted to the High Courts. The answer came in response to a question posed by an MP from CPI (M) John Brittas.

The submitted data reveals that a total of 126 of 164 recommendations are pending with the Central Government with different departments: Department of Justice (35), Prime Minister's Office (03), Ministry of Law and Justice (13), yet to be sent to the Supreme Court Collegium (75). It also mentioned that 55 proposals had been remitted/returned by the Government to the High Courts on the advice of the Supreme Court Collegium during the current year.

On Judicial Appointments, the Minister revealed that in 2021 alone,09 judges were appointed in Supreme Court, and 118 judges were appointed in various High Courts. Government appoints only those persons as Judges of High Courts who the Supreme Court Collegium recommends.  He further stated

"Filling up vacancies in the High Courts is a continuous, integrated, and collaborative process between the Executive and the Judiciary. It requires consultation and approval from various constitutional authorities at the state and central levels. While every effort is made to fill up the existing vacancies expeditiously, vacancies of Judges in High Courts do keep on arising on account of retirement, resignation, or elevation of Judges and also due to an increase in the strength of Judges."

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